zeldathemes
:Duude:
Chickahdee
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Julie.23.Canadian.
Questioning gender.
But I'm open to any pronoun.
Pansexual/Queer.
General Interest Blog.
Mostly inspiration and refs.
»

shugarskull:

Yeon Woo Jhi

  #model    #reference    #character idea  

futsingaround:

littlemammal:

littlemammal:

6 selfies 2k14

not a guy, they/them

serious hair goals

  #model    #reference    #reminds me of    #ulf  
perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. Weknow. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get outa pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.

CREDIT [X]  [X]

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. Weknow. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get outa pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.

CREDIT [X]  [X]

  #panic attack    #reference    #important    #useful  

wannabeanimator:

via Flooby Nooby

  #reference    #tutorial    #guide    #making comics    #important  

yagazieemezi:

Photographer: Thandiwe Muriu
Makeup Artist: Cultured Ego
Model: Anok Kuol

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

  #model    #reference  

his-submissive-girl:

thedragonflywarrior:

The Body Shapes of the World’s Best Athletes Compared Side By Side

Health and fitness comes in all shapes and sizes. Every single one of these athletes is a certified bad-ass.

Look at all the beautiful people!

  #body types    #reference    #model    #wow    #I think I reblogged this before    #body    #body shapes    #inspiration    #character idea  

fashionsfromhistory:

"1863 Doll" from the Gratitude Train

Weill

1949

MET

  #model    #reference    #clothing    #outfit  

sunyshore:

Scans of original new art from the new Free! Eternal Summer Guidebook, on sale today! There is much more inside, including detailed character designs and genga/douga from the first episode. Sorry I am not very good at scanning books like this, but please enjoy anyway!

These scans include the full cover, back and front, ending design sketches by director Utsumi, and other drawings by the character designer.

  #free!    #swimming anime    #concept art    #reference    #heckyes  

prettyblackpastel:

Model and Blogger Nikia Phoenix for CurlDuchess/KisforKinky

  #mode    #reference  

so-treu:

suthrnblakbear:

Texas Rangers player Prince Fielder from ESPN’s upcoming 2014 Body Issue. Daaaaaamn!

this shit literally made my morning. hell, my whole DAY.

  #prince fielder    #texas rangers    #photoshoot    #photoset    #model    #reference  
  #model    #reference    #dapper old man    #wow  
colorfulcuties:

dyehardblackhair:

ikeslimster:

ELAINE
PHOTOGRAPHY BY IKE SLIMSTER

*


❤

colorfulcuties:

dyehardblackhair:

ikeslimster:

ELAINE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY IKE SLIMSTER

*

  #model    #reference    #wow    #WOW  

Proportional habit #1

howthefuckdoyouplaypiano:

1\2s, 1/3rds and scale.

I’m sure you have seen In turn around sheets or old masters paintings some lines deducing a figure into heads or perhaps a
Line splitting an object in two directly down the middle. These relationships are used as a prime example of measuring but have a tendency to be presented In an overly mechanical way.

however there is something you can rely on and build a sense for, and that is 1/2’s and 3rds, i will go into more detail about why this is so important but for now all you need to know is that all devisions within proportion can fall onto one of these devisions….A third or a half. 

So today I’m going to attempt to show a new way to help understand and gain a feel for this method by using a special tool.

Consider this the training wheels of proportion, as you use them the wheels may slowly break away and you slowly find yourself cycling on your own, completely free from restraint (or you’ll crash horribly and have to start again, but you get the point). image

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-all the best!

-Ross Hvidsten.

  #proportions    #tutorial    #guide    #reference    #to read  

shanellbklyn:

itsthelesbiana:

cultureunseen:

Yassine Rahal

https://twitter.com/YassineRahal
https://www.facebook.com/yassinemodel

Fro game immaculate

Why can’t I bump into guys that look like this is real life?!

  #model    #reference  
ironandvalor:

Kelp forests have always been so…….alluring to me. I used to watch videos of orcas darting in between the stretches of green; I fell in love.

ironandvalor:

Kelp forests have always been so…….alluring to me. I used to watch videos of orcas darting in between the stretches of green; I fell in love.

  #background    #reference    #water    #ocean    #ref for    #skargarden