zeldathemes
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Julie.23.Canadian.
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General Interest Blog.
Mostly inspiration and refs.
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faitherinhicks:

firstsecondbooks:


(I have taken this photo of the awesomeness that is TCAF from blogTO.)
If you are a comics-creating person, it is possible that one of your goals is to have publishers notice you!  Because some day (perhaps now) you have a book that it’d be great if they could publish.
What are good ways to to make this happen? Here are five easy tips from the folks at First Second! http://www.firstsecondbooks.com/behind-the-scenes/make-publishers-notice-you/


Some good advice on getting publishers to notice you. I did #1, and none of the other things, so if you were like me, incredibly socially awkward & terrified of people late into my 20s, there is hope for you. Now I’m fine & feel somewhat okay talking to strangers at conventions, but I remember reading advice like “go to parties, make friends with publishers” when I was first trying to get published and feeling like that was the most impossible mountain to climb.
People who are comfortable approaching other people at conventions from day 1, I am envious of you! ;)
I should maybe do a “breaking into comics for the super-shy” blog post.

faitherinhicks:

firstsecondbooks:

(I have taken this photo of the awesomeness that is TCAF from blogTO.)

If you are a comics-creating person, it is possible that one of your goals is to have publishers notice you!  Because some day (perhaps now) you have a book that it’d be great if they could publish.

What are good ways to to make this happen? Here are five easy tips from the folks at First Second! http://www.firstsecondbooks.com/behind-the-scenes/make-publishers-notice-you/

Some good advice on getting publishers to notice you. I did #1, and none of the other things, so if you were like me, incredibly socially awkward & terrified of people late into my 20s, there is hope for you. Now I’m fine & feel somewhat okay talking to strangers at conventions, but I remember reading advice like “go to parties, make friends with publishers” when I was first trying to get published and feeling like that was the most impossible mountain to climb.

People who are comfortable approaching other people at conventions from day 1, I am envious of you! ;)

I should maybe do a “breaking into comics for the super-shy” blog post.

  #comics    #comic making    #publishing    #tcaf    #advice  

gingerhaze:

callmeprofessor:

dommykittenmommy:

gingerhaze:

Oh, I know I have it better than a lot of would-be comics buyers, and that’s what worries me. I’ve had it with the self-appointed gatekeepers in comics. 

I hate going into the gaming stores alone. Ugh.

I will continously write this reply until I feel it sticks. Do you want to know why many male nerds are so defensive and harsh about this?

Okey, I can with confidence tell you that the majority of us started this out as a form of escapism. I mean, look at all the tumblr posts about “I love fiction, it’s my way to handle reality” etc etc. It was the same for us. suddenly.. about, idk, 4-5 years ago, feminists started to tell us that we are in the wrong for BUYING things. Instead of going to the writers, we’re the bad guys. Comics I grew up with are being torn to pieces by people who don’t read them anyway. They’re causalized because instead of catering to us, they’re catering to people who don’t really care. I know that the majority of you will go “oh, grow up!”, but you know what? Fuck you, comics were one of the things I had growing up, I emotionally connected to the Hulk, it made me feel that maybe it wasn’t so bad to be a freak.

secondly, I don’t know why women expect to get help with everything and just give up when they don’t get help. When I started out, do you really think anyone would even care about a fat, acne-cursed kid? I did ask, once, they just looked at me and told me to just read the damn comics. So I did. I got into the middle of a story, If I liked it, I tried to hunt down the first one, or the one after. Rinse and repeat. not hard. But now! NOW! You have google, I’m not even kidding, it will take you 30 secs to find ALL information you want. I don’t know why everyone think that being a nerd is “share and share alike!”, it’s socially outcast people who have been wrecked emotionally and socially by other people. You really think that they’re gonna help you without a reason?

I know, it’s really “in” to be a nerd these days, but you’re not a nerd until you know your shit. Don’t believe me?

http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/nerd?q=nerd

Being a nerd isn’t something that you flaunt, you’re not gonna get help getting into it, you’re not gonna get praise for trying to. read, then read some more, then read even more. Then doublecheck that info. Not because you’re gonna be “safe” when trying to have people acknowledge your “nerd-cred”, but because you LOVE IT! It’s not a social thing, it has never been. It’s not about sitting around a table and going “OMG! I’m such a nerd! I read a couple of books!”.

Sounds harsh? yeah, it is. But, if you love it, it won’t matter. Cuz you will still have the time of your life. And really.. no one promised to help you. want help? help yourself.

*preparing to get unfollowed by everyone*

btw, I’m not saying that no one can like the same things as me/nerds/others. I’m saying “you’re not special for doing that” and “LOVE IT MORE! If you can’t find basic facts without being spoonfed, do you really LOVE it?”

Okay, you pedantic asshole, listen here.

You read a comic by a woman who reads, cares about, and EARNS A PAYCHECK from comics, that has been reblogged LITERALLY THOUSANDS OF TIMES by other women/minorities who read, care about, and earn paychecks from comics, and you have to gall to say that comics are “catering to people who don’t really care”?

Because you were picked last at kickball and now YOU want to be the bully. Because someone told you you weren’t worthy of something, now you want to be the one to tell other people that they’re not worthy of something. 

First you say “this is escapism for us men” and then you say “no one HELPED me get into it” as if having a medium LITERALLY CONSTRUCTED AROUND PEOPLE WHO ARE EXACTLY LIKE YOU isn’t the biggest spoonfeeding you could possibly get. 

And now there’s a whole lot of people who don’t fit YOUR very narrow definition of what a “true nerd” can be who are FIGHTING UPHILL to be a part of this thing they love that doesn’t love them back and you have the nerve to say they don’t CARE about it enough and they’re expecting special treatment. As if it’s special treatment to BE SAFE FROM HARASSMENT, SEXUALIZATION, AND CONDESCENSION IN A PUBLIC SPACE.

No one’s taking comics away from straight white men. But I certainly wouldn’t mind taking it out of the hands of men like you, that’s for sure. You’re dinosaurs. And you’re not a REAL nerd.

  #reply    #feminism    #comics    #nerd    #geek    #sexism    #I was really hoping someone would rip this guy a new one    #rant    #good read    #comic    #gingerhaze  

captainmwai:

A study in panel borders:
Inspired by this awesome post about making comics quickly, I took a look at some comics I own to get some sense of different kinds of panel design choices.

I came away feeling like I’d learned a little less than I’d hoped, but here are some takeaways:

* You can get away with smaller panels than you think
* Extremely weird comic panels CAN work, but when it fails it looks painful and forced.
* Simple is not bad.
* There are actually a LOT of possible combinations.

Specific notes:

Scott McCloud uses a 4x3 sliceup of the page, and it’s four VERTICAL slices and three HORIZONTAL ones, which is weird because it makes the panels, on average, LESS square. This works with the particular comic really WELL though, because he draws himself in closeup, talking, a LOT.

DAR and Narbonic both are webcomics mashed into book format, but both worked surprisingly well as page layout in the end.

Blacksad is REALLY variable and the page layouts are hand-crafted on a per-page basis. No speed gains here, but perhaps a message that full custom has its place.

The Resonator is fairly formal but never *too* rigid with panel choices. Lots of narrow or tall panels, which works as a way to alternate between big establishing shots and dense dialog. Very tall panels for single speaker, long ones for two-person dialog or to combine a lot of text and visuals. In general, Resonator is print-native and has TINY text…

Ultimate X-Men is a fun read but the panel design is a disaster. Almost none of the choices of graphic design work at all. Occasionally an establishing shot hits home, but in general the layout is trying WAY too hard.

Watchmen. Formalism raised to the ultimate. It’s precise, it’s a 3x3 grid, it’s piss-on-a-plate-with-no-spills precise and that’s fine, for two reasons: one, everything is about time, and two, it gets the panels the hell out of the way of the story.

Augustus is an example of what Ultimate X-Men was trying to do, except it succeeds. Lots of variation, but on average very orderly. Kind of strikes me as the sort of thing you “have to be GOOD” to pull off well.

  #comic making    #panel    #panelling    #important    #critique    #reference    #comics  
fyeahartstudentowl:

kendrawcandraw:

mixtapecomics:

After a discussion last week with several of my cartoonist peers (and at the behest of Steve Bissette): I want to talk about image theft and uncredited content on social media. I’m only going to speak from personal experience (and only about the one image posted above) but I hope that this example will show the disservice this causes to any artist whose artwork is edited and reposted without credit.
[Disclaimer: I post all my work online for free. I want people to read, enjoy, and share my work. I have no problem with people reposting my work if it’s credited and unaltered. (That way new readers can find their way to my site to read more.) My problem is when people edit out the URL and copyright information to repost the images as their own for fun or profit.]
Below, I’ve listed the sites where my comic was posted and how many times it was viewed on / shared from each of those sites. (The following list was composed from the first ten pages of Google.) Let’s take a look at the life of this comic over the last 11 months. 
On January 23 (2013) I posted the comic on my journal comic website, Intentionally Left Blank, and on my corresponding art Tumblr (where it currently has 5,442 notes). The same day, it was posted (intact, with the original URL and copyright) to Reddit. (There, credited, it has received 50,535 views.)The Reddit post alone was exciting but on January 24, someone posted an edited version of the image (with the URL and copyright removed) to 9GAG. That uncredited posting has been voted on 29,629 times and shared on Facebook 22,517 times. That uncredited image caught on and spread like wildfire:
January 25: LOLchamp (39 comments. Views unknown.)January 26: WeHeartIt. (With the 9GAG ad at the bottom. Views unknown.)January 26: Random Overload (2 Facebook likes. Views unknown).January 26: CatMoji (41 reactions. Views unknown.)January 26: The Meta Picture (1,800+ Facebook likes. 6,000+ Pintrest shares)
February 5: damnLOL. (929 Facebook shares. Views unknown.)February 7: LOLhappens. (1,400+ Facebook shares.)February ?: LOLmaze (121 shares)February ?: LOLzbook (37 likes and 37 shares).On March 25, I was lucky and this comic was featured in a Buzzfeed post “36 Illustrated Truths About Cats.” The comic was featured alongside work by a 35 other artists who I admire and aspire to be. (Exciting!)Buzzfeed was able to trace the uncredited image back to me and listed a source link to my main website but still posted the uncredited version of the image. The post currently has 6,000+ Facebook shares, 14,000+ Facebook likes, and 727 Tweets. Ever the optimist, I’ll count those numbers in the “credited views” column.The problem with Buzzfeed posting the uncredited image and only listing the source underneath was: people began to save their favourite comics from the article and repost them in their personal blogs without credit. (13, 3, and 60 Facebook likes, respectfully.) I’m mentioning this not to target Buzzfeed or the individuals reposting, but to show the importance of leaving the credits in the original image.March 30: FunnyStuff247. (47,588 views.)March 31: LOLcoaster. (1 Facebook like. Views unknown.) April 5: ROFLzone. (1,200+ Facebook shares. Views unknown.)April 26: LOLwall. (70 Facebook likes. Views unknown.)
July 23: The uncredited image was chopped into four smaller pieces and posted on the Tumblr of TheAmericanKid, where he sourced it to FunnyStuff247. (124,786 notes and featured in #Animals on Tumblr.)
Aug 21: Eng-Jokes.com. (87,818 views and 41,400+ Facebook shares.)
Oct 2: MemeCenter. (284 Facebook likes. Views unknown.)Oct 5: FunnyJunk. (3,327 views.)Oct 10: LikeaLaugh. (1,486 views.)
Nov 20: Quickmeme. (280,090 Facebook shares. Views unknown.)Nov 20: JustMemes. (6 Facebook shares.)
There were 14 other sites which listed uncredited versions of the image within the first 10 pages of Google, but they were personal blogs so I’m not going to include them here.
One additional website I haven’t mentioned was Cheezburger, who originally posted the uncredited version of comic on January 23; but later modified it to the credited image after I contacted them. They didn’t contact me when they made the change but the image currently has 2,912 votes and 4,700 Facebook shares. Let’s be optimistic and count those as credited views and shares. 
That brings us up to the current views and shares of the comic. Now let’s do some math.
I’ve removed the comments and reactions (because they could already be accounted for in views). I’ve left in votes, however, because some sites list votes instead of views.
Taking into consideration that Tumblr notes are made up of both likes and reblogs, let’s be conservative and say the Tumblr notes are twice as high as they should be. (That every single person that has viewed the image on Tumblr has liked the image and reblogged it.) Dividing the Tumblr notes in half, that leaves us with:
Posts using the credited image:2,912 votes2,721 Tumblr notes50,535 views727 Tweets0 Pintrest shares14,000 Facebook likes10,700 Facebook shares
Posts using the uncredited image:29,629 votes62,393 Tumblr notes140,219 views0 Tweets6,000 Pintrest shares2,085 Facebook likes347,984 Facebook shares
Adding those up and treating them all like views (assuming that every shared post was viewed once):
The original (unaltered, credited/sourced) version of the comic has been viewed 81,595 times.
The edited, uncredited/unsourced version of the comic has been viewed 588,310 times. (That’s over half a million views. Seven times more than the original, credited version.)
What does that mean for me as a creator? On the positive side, I created something that people found relatable and enjoyable. I succeeded at that thing I try to do. But, given the lack of credit, it also means that 88% of 669,905 people that read this comic had no chance of finding their way back to my website.
This was a successful comic. I want to be able to call this exposure a success. But those numbers are heartbreaking.
Morally, just the idea of taking someone’s work and removing the URL and copyright info to repost it is reprehensible. You are cutting the creator out of the creation. But worse yet, sites like 9GAG are profiting off the uncredited images that they’re posting.
9GAG is currently ranked #299 in the world according to Alexa rankings. As of April of this year, their estimated net worth was around $9.8 million, generating nearly $13,415 every day in ad revenue.
As a creator of content that they use on their site: I see none of that. And I have no chance of seeing any kind of revenue since readers can’t find their way back to my site from an uncredited image. 
I don’t want to sound bitter. The money isn’t the point. But this is a thing that’s happening. This isn’t just happening to me. It’s actively happening to the greater art community as a whole. (Especially the comics community. Recent artists effected by altered artwork/theft off the top of my head: Liz Prince, Luke Healy, Nation of Amanda, Melanie Gillman, etc.) Our work is being stolen and profited off of. Right this second.
I do my best to see the positive in these events but the very least I can do as a creator is stand up in this small moment and say “This is mine. I made this.”
Something need to be done by the community as a whole: by the readers as well as the creators. We need to start crediting our content/sources and reporting those who don’t. Sites like 9GAG need to be held accountable for their theft of work. If you see something that’s stolen: say something to the original poster, report the post, or contact the creator of the artwork.
If you have an image you’d like to post but don’t know the source: reverse Google image search it. Figure out where it came from before you post. If you like it enough to share it, it means there’s probably more where that came from.

This is long. Please read the whole thing.
This is something that is near and dear to my heart. As someone who has had several of my comics go viral, my work has been stolen across the internet with little or no credit to me, and I cannot stress enough how much this kind of treatment hurts artists.
Myself and hundreds/thousands of artists today put our work online for free because we want to share it with the world. That doesn’t mean it is up for grabs, nor does it mean we do not expect credit. This is our livelihood. Not all of us are lucky enough to have a day job that pays the bills, and even with a 9-to-5, we rely on our art to make a living.
Sites like BuzzFeed and 9GAG make a profit off of our work with no credit to us, no permission from us, and often no intention to ever rectify those things. This is theft.
It’s not just about money. It’s about respect and credit where credit is due. 
Please, for the love of God, stop supporting the casual theft and disrespect the internet shows to artists who are sharing their work with you. Don’t reblog art that isn’t credited to the artist. Don’t repost art from creators. Reblog from the source. Don’t delete artist’s comments.
If you like the art, support the artist. 

Reblogging this here because this is IMPORTANT.
If you’re a creator who is sharing their work online, you already know how this goes.
Protect yourself as best you can: watermark your work in a way that is difficult to remove, metatag it with your name, contact the sites that steal your work and tell them to remove it, etc.
We can work toward an internet culture that credits and respects artists if we work together and stop supporting these sites that steal from creators. Let’s do our part.

It’s things like this that always make me weary about posting much of anything online out of fear that it’ll get stolen somehow. Please don’t ever repost someone’s art or take out their credits!

fyeahartstudentowl:

kendrawcandraw:

mixtapecomics:

After a discussion last week with several of my cartoonist peers (and at the behest of Steve Bissette): I want to talk about image theft and uncredited content on social media. I’m only going to speak from personal experience (and only about the one image posted above) but I hope that this example will show the disservice this causes to any artist whose artwork is edited and reposted without credit.

[Disclaimer: I post all my work online for free. I want people to read, enjoy, and share my work. I have no problem with people reposting my work if it’s credited and unaltered. (That way new readers can find their way to my site to read more.) My problem is when people edit out the URL and copyright information to repost the images as their own for fun or profit.]

Below, I’ve listed the sites where my comic was posted and how many times it was viewed on / shared from each of those sites. (The following list was composed from the first ten pages of Google.) Let’s take a look at the life of this comic over the last 11 months.
 

On January 23 (2013) I posted the comic on my journal comic website, Intentionally Left Blank, and on my corresponding art Tumblr (where it currently has 5,442 notes). The same day, it was posted (intact, with the original URL and copyright) to Reddit. (There, credited, it has received 50,535 views.)

The Reddit post alone was exciting but on January 24, someone posted an edited version of the image (with the URL and copyright removed) to 9GAG. That uncredited posting has been voted on 29,629 times and shared on Facebook 22,517 times. That uncredited image caught on and spread like wildfire:

January 25: LOLchamp (39 comments. Views unknown.)
January 26: WeHeartIt. (With the 9GAG ad at the bottom. Views unknown.)
January 26: Random Overload (2 Facebook likes. Views unknown).
January 26: CatMoji (41 reactions. Views unknown.)
January 26: The Meta Picture (1,800+ Facebook likes. 6,000+ Pintrest shares)

February 5: damnLOL. (929 Facebook shares. Views unknown.)
February 7: LOLhappens. (1,400+ Facebook shares.)
February ?: LOLmaze (121 shares)
February ?: LOLzbook (37 likes and 37 shares).

On March 25, I was lucky and this comic was featured in a Buzzfeed post 36 Illustrated Truths About Cats.” The comic was featured alongside work by a 35 other artists who I admire and aspire to be. (Exciting!)

Buzzfeed was able to trace the uncredited image back to me and listed a source link to my main website but still posted the uncredited version of the image. The post currently has 6,000+ Facebook shares, 14,000+ Facebook likes, and 727 Tweets. Ever the optimist, I’ll count those numbers in the “credited views” column.

The problem with Buzzfeed posting the uncredited image and only listing the source underneath was: people began to save their favourite comics from the article and repost them in their personal blogs without credit. (13, 3, and 60 Facebook likes, respectfully.) I’m mentioning this not to target Buzzfeed or the individuals reposting, but to show the importance of leaving the credits in the original image.

March 30: FunnyStuff247. (47,588 views.)
March 31: LOLcoaster. (1 Facebook like. Views unknown.) 

April 5: ROFLzone. (1,200+ Facebook shares. Views unknown.)
April 26: LOLwall. (70 Facebook likes. Views unknown.)

July 23: The uncredited image was chopped into four smaller pieces and posted on the Tumblr of TheAmericanKid, where he sourced it to FunnyStuff247. (124,786 notes and featured in #Animals on Tumblr.)

Aug 21: Eng-Jokes.com. (87,818 views and 41,400+ Facebook shares.)

Oct 2: MemeCenter. (284 Facebook likes. Views unknown.)
Oct 5: FunnyJunk. (3,327 views.)
Oct 10: LikeaLaugh. (1,486 views.)

Nov 20: Quickmeme(280,090 Facebook shares. Views unknown.)
Nov 20: JustMemes. (6 Facebook shares.)

There were 14 other sites which listed uncredited versions of the image within the first 10 pages of Google, but they were personal blogs so I’m not going to include them here.

One additional website I haven’t mentioned was Cheezburger, who originally posted the uncredited version of comic on January 23; but later modified it to the credited image after I contacted them. They didn’t contact me when they made the change but the image currently has 2,912 votes and 4,700 Facebook shares. Let’s be optimistic and count those as credited views and shares.
 

That brings us up to the current views and shares of the comic. Now let’s do some math.

I’ve removed the comments and reactions (because they could already be accounted for in views). I’ve left in votes, however, because some sites list votes instead of views.

Taking into consideration that Tumblr notes are made up of both likes and reblogs, let’s be conservative and say the Tumblr notes are twice as high as they should be. (That every single person that has viewed the image on Tumblr has liked the image and reblogged it.) Dividing the Tumblr notes in half, that leaves us with:

Posts using the credited image:
2,912 votes
2,721 Tumblr notes
50,535 views
727 Tweets
0 Pintrest shares
14,000 Facebook likes
10,700 Facebook shares

Posts using the uncredited image:
29,629 votes
62,393 Tumblr notes
140,219 views
0 Tweets
6,000 Pintrest shares
2,085 Facebook likes
347,984 Facebook shares

Adding those up and treating them all like views (assuming that every shared post was viewed once):

The original (unaltered, credited/sourced) version of the comic has been viewed 81,595 times.

The edited, uncredited/unsourced version of the comic has been viewed 588,310 times. (That’s over half a million views. Seven times more than the original, credited version.)

What does that mean for me as a creator? On the positive side, I created something that people found relatable and enjoyable. I succeeded at that thing I try to do. But, given the lack of credit, it also means that 88% of 669,905 people that read this comic had no chance of finding their way back to my website.

This was a successful comic. I want to be able to call this exposure a success. But those numbers are heartbreaking.

Morally, just the idea of taking someone’s work and removing the URL and copyright info to repost it is reprehensible. You are cutting the creator out of the creation. But worse yet, sites like 9GAG are profiting off the uncredited images that they’re posting.

9GAG is currently ranked #299 in the world according to Alexa rankings. As of April of this year, their estimated net worth was around $9.8 million, generating nearly $13,415 every day in ad revenue.

As a creator of content that they use on their site: I see none of that. And I have no chance of seeing any kind of revenue since readers can’t find their way back to my site from an uncredited image.
 

I don’t want to sound bitter. The money isn’t the point. But this is a thing that’s happening. This isn’t just happening to me. It’s actively happening to the greater art community as a whole. (Especially the comics community. Recent artists effected by altered artwork/theft off the top of my head: Liz Prince, Luke Healy, Nation of Amanda, Melanie Gillman, etc.) Our work is being stolen and profited off of. Right this second.

I do my best to see the positive in these events but the very least I can do as a creator is stand up in this small moment and say “This is mine. I made this.”

Something need to be done by the community as a whole: by the readers as well as the creators. We need to start crediting our content/sources and reporting those who don’t. Sites like 9GAG need to be held accountable for their theft of work. If you see something that’s stolen: say something to the original poster, report the post, or contact the creator of the artwork.

If you have an image you’d like to post but don’t know the source: reverse Google image search it. Figure out where it came from before you post. If you like it enough to share it, it means there’s probably more where that came from.

This is long. Please read the whole thing.

This is something that is near and dear to my heart. As someone who has had several of my comics go viral, my work has been stolen across the internet with little or no credit to me, and I cannot stress enough how much this kind of treatment hurts artists.

Myself and hundreds/thousands of artists today put our work online for free because we want to share it with the world. That doesn’t mean it is up for grabs, nor does it mean we do not expect credit. This is our livelihood. Not all of us are lucky enough to have a day job that pays the bills, and even with a 9-to-5, we rely on our art to make a living.

Sites like BuzzFeed and 9GAG make a profit off of our work with no credit to us, no permission from us, and often no intention to ever rectify those things. This is theft.

It’s not just about money. It’s about respect and credit where credit is due. 

Please, for the love of God, stop supporting the casual theft and disrespect the internet shows to artists who are sharing their work with you. Don’t reblog art that isn’t credited to the artist. Don’t repost art from creators. Reblog from the source. Don’t delete artist’s comments.

If you like the art, support the artist. 

Reblogging this here because this is IMPORTANT.

If you’re a creator who is sharing their work online, you already know how this goes.

Protect yourself as best you can: watermark your work in a way that is difficult to remove, metatag it with your name, contact the sites that steal your work and tell them to remove it, etc.

We can work toward an internet culture that credits and respects artists if we work together and stop supporting these sites that steal from creators. Let’s do our part.

It’s things like this that always make me weary about posting much of anything online out of fear that it’ll get stolen somehow. Please don’t ever repost someone’s art or take out their credits!

  #art theft    #reposting    #art    #comics    #good read    #text post    #rant  

thorsty:

AU in which Lady Sif is banished to Midgard and falls in love with astrophysicist Jane Foster

(for whatsalittleincest)

  #sif    #jane foster    #thor    #I ship it    #marvel    #comics    #what if  

Dazzling DC Ladies Month - Danica Williams | The Flash

  #dc    #comics    #the flash    #danica williams    #cutie  

my random anger at DC continues

fannybawws:

Of course the dudebro division of DC wants to get rid of Dick Grayson. They haven’t done it, but only because they must grudgingly admit it would cause too much public outcry. Still, they’ve been trying it for years.

In 2010, Dan Didio and Brian Azzarello had this to say:

There was lots of applause for the Batman books, as DiDio continued to tease fans about his Dick Grayson deathwish. He revealed that “up until the eleventh hour, [Grayson] was gonna die in Infinite Crisis, and a lot after that had to be revised. But there turned out to be an outpour of trying to protect him, since he grew up with his fans. This is why we turned him into Batman.” Azzarello mockingly replied that “he’s not my Batman,” while Van Sciver observed that “every fangirl [he’s] ever met is in love with Dick Grayson. Women love that character.”

And that’s the crux of their problem with him, isn’t it? Women love him.

He was a queer icon from the start, a part of their history that DC hates to remember. Later, girls found they could explore their desires safely by crushing on him as Robin, a non-threatening, sweet, and fun character. God forbid anyone post-Miller be joyful.

He grew up into Nightwing, a character women lusted over, not because he was bursting with muscles and machismo (that’s mostly a male power fantasy) but because he was beautiful and displayed evocative emotions.

Dick has always been ambiguous in how he presents his gender, straddling the line between the traditionally feminine and traditionally masculine. Favoring bright and flamboyant clothing, being placed in the ‘damsel’ role consistently, dating women more powerful than him, stretching into gymnastic poses, even crossdressing full-stop.

Certain kinds of men (read: insecure assholes) don’t like that. They don’t like it when men are vulnerable, feminine, open. When they’re sexualized like female characters are. They don’t like it when those men are admired heroes. And they like it even less when women and queer people find them attractive. It’s threatening to them, as assertive sexuality from women and queer men always has been.

It’s okay to dislike Dick Grayson because you just don’t find him compelling, but the root of the most vitriolic hatred of Robin, especially Dick’s Robin, is usually homophobia and/or misogyny.

It doesn’t surprise me that Dan DiDio saw that women adored Dick Grayson and wanted to rip him right out of their hands like a toddler. He exudes anger and resentment for the people who call him on his bullshit. I think he enjoyed milking the possibility of killing Nightwing.

If Dick hadn’t been around since comics came into the zeitgeist, he’d probably be on the chopping block.

  #dc    #comics    #dick grayson    #good read    #dan didio  

bigbigtruck:

Got some questions from a reader who’s starting their own comic and am reposting my responses with their permission:

Read More

  #comics    #comic advice    #advice    #motivation    #bigbigtruck  
shoomlah:

lissabt:

Comics about Comic-con!
My dream scenario also includes grabbing drinks and becoming twitter friends and just plain bein’ cool like Fonzie. Like a goddamn pro.
Consider this a formal apology to everyone i meet this weekend.

Lissa tellin’ it like it is.

shoomlah:

lissabt:

Comics about Comic-con!

My dream scenario also includes grabbing drinks and becoming twitter friends and just plain bein’ cool like Fonzie. Like a goddamn pro.

Consider this a formal apology to everyone i meet this weekend.

Lissa tellin’ it like it is.

  #comics    #comic con    #my life  
I’m open for commissionsI can do:-Nsfw art including: m/m, f/f, m/f, ect. (though I’m not too skilled in any bdsm or most fetishes. Also humans/mostly humans only).-Furries (these are excluded from nsfw though).-Animals (also excluded from nsfw).-Original Characters (I’ll need a few references).-Fanart (I’ll need references).-Ask if you’d like anything not listed here. I am not limited to this list.Notes:-All commissions will emailed to the commissioner in their highest quality. Usually I’ll send a link to my stash.-All commissions will be posted up onto my artblog (jpdraw.tumblr) watermarked and much lesser quality than the original. -I ask that all commissioners refrain from posting the larger quality (which is not watermarked) image on the internet without my permission.-Commissioners can ask me to not post commissions onto the internet.-I may use commissions in portfolios, but will never sell a commission unless allowed to by the commissioner.-Please be as specific as you can when describing your commission.-I have the right to refuse any commission I recieve for any reason. -Payment must be made before I begin the commission.Thank you,JP

I’m open for commissions

I can do:
-Nsfw art including: m/m, f/f, m/f, ect. (though I’m not too skilled in any bdsm or most fetishes. Also humans/mostly humans only).
-Furries (these are excluded from nsfw though).
-Animals (also excluded from nsfw).
-Original Characters (I’ll need a few references).
-Fanart (I’ll need references).
-Ask if you’d like anything not listed here. I am not limited to this list.

Notes:
-All commissions will emailed to the commissioner in their highest quality. Usually I’ll send a link to my stash.
-All commissions will be posted up onto my artblog (jpdraw.tumblr) watermarked and much lesser quality than the original.
-I ask that all commissioners refrain from posting the larger quality (which is not watermarked) image on the internet without my permission.
-Commissioners can ask me to not post commissions onto the internet.
-I may use commissions in portfolios, but will never sell a commission unless allowed to by the commissioner.
-Please be as specific as you can when describing your commission.
-I have the right to refuse any commission I recieve for any reason.
-Payment must be made before I begin the commission.

Thank you,
JP

  #commissions    #cartoons    #comics    #onceler    #lorax    #sketches    #ink    #colour    #color    #please    #my art  

m-azing:

Nine More Webcomics Recs (Happy Holidays!)

Ava’s Demon - In a distant future, young Ava flees her alien-desolated planet but can’t shake the cruel demon who preys on her mind and body.

Cucumber Quest - Cucumber would rather go to magic school and leave the hero-ing up to his younger sister, but with the Nightmare Knight threatening his kingdom, he might have to take a gap year.

The Fox Sister - In 1968 Korea, a young woman hunts for the kumiho that stalks the streets for victims, wearing the form of her dead sister.

Knights-Errant - Wilfred the Heartless joins the famed mercenary company, the Errant Knights, and has to take care not to get killed by enemies, racists, or his own brutal captain, Oswald.

The Less-Than-Epic Adventures of TJ and Amal - After coming out to his family and getting promptly disowned, Amal meets TJ, with whom he made a drunken deal: to split the cost of driving cross-country to attend Amal’s sister’s graduation.

Nimona - When professional villain Ballister Blackheart gets a new sidekick, he gets more than he bargained for: Nimona, a shapeshifter with pink hair and a habit of taking evil a little too far for even Blackheart’s taste.

Oglaf! - Various comics set in fantasy worlds, usually erotic and always hilarious. WARNING: Many comics are NSFW, but the archive offers plenty of help on which are suitable to view in public.

Plume - Armed with an immortal bodyguard and a gun, Vesper Grey ventures into the wild west to avenge her father’s murder.

Todd Allison and the Petunia Violet - Petunia tries to be a good neighbor and gets swept up with a government conspiracy, a hitman, a serial bomber, and numerous mysterious and equally ill-mannered people for her troubles.

  #comics    #webcomic    #comic    #all the yes  

anaeolist:

This is entirely my friend’s fault, who in the course of one of our endless hobbit natterings said “can you imagine if Bilbo woke up early one morning and caught them braiding each other’s hair?”

(and I know they just leave their braids in all the time but it was really funny ok just let me have this)

  #the hobbit    #doodles    #comics    #fanart    #bilbo baggins    #braaaidddssss  

isaia:

giancarlovolpe:

Hey kids!  If you’re a filmmaker, animator, or storyboard artist and you don’t know what screen direction is, you might want to read this.

For the record, there are always exceptions to the rule in filmmaking, which is why I pointed out 3 examples here.

I’ve also found that comic books tend to NOT take screen direction as seriously as film does, but I’m still on the fence if this is wise or not.  My favorite comics pay close attention to screen direction so as to not confuse the reader.

Good luck!

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!! YES

  #comics    #reference    #tutorial    #screen direction    #for later    #comic making  

innervenom:

“That… that’s the first time anyone’s EVER called me that…”


From Uncanny X-force #35 by Rick Remender. 

  #Uncanny X-force    #Marvel    #Comics    #Deadpool    #Apocalypse    #Marvel Comics    #Evan    #Genesis  
welcometohellfilm:

It’s Sock in a dress!
I don’t know, go look at my kickstarter.
The last stretch of promoting this thing will be me running out of ideas and making terrible choices.  FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELTS, TOMORROW I POST CHIBI-MAKER FILES.Also hey if anyone uses Reddit, feel free to share there.  I plan on doing that eventually but that’s like the one corner of the internet I don’t visit that might actually be interested. 


GUYS DONAAATTEEEE PLEEEASSEEE WOOOO!!!! I’ma keep rebloggering this ‘till the end of time! ALSO I’LL DRAW YOU ANYTHING YOU WANT EVER!

welcometohellfilm:

It’s Sock in a dress!

I don’t know, go look at my kickstarter.

The last stretch of promoting this thing will be me running out of ideas and making terrible choices.  FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELTS, TOMORROW I POST CHIBI-MAKER FILES.

Also hey if anyone uses Reddit, feel free to share there.  I plan on doing that eventually but that’s like the one corner of the internet I don’t visit that might actually be interested. 

GUYS DONAAATTEEEE PLEEEASSEEE WOOOO!!!! I’ma keep rebloggering this ‘till the end of time! ALSO I’LL DRAW YOU ANYTHING YOU WANT EVER!

  #animation    #hand drawn    #character    #story    #welcome to hell    #sock    #jonathan    #kickstarter    #cartoon    #student film    #spooky    #ghost    #demon    #short film    #real-faker    #deviant art    #comics